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Very old computer game gems

Discussion in 'Computer Game Geeks' started by amusicsite, 25 Sep 2019.

  1. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    I have the most respect for the early computer game programmers. To create a game within memory limitations that would not cope with a typical modern website's css file.

    http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20190919-the-maze-puzzle-hidden-within-an-early-video-game

    This is a classic example of the sort of hack they had to use. There was not enough storage to save maps so typically they were generated from an algorithm. Much like the modern world which is increasingly run on algorithms.

    In this case the programmer, apparently while drunk, came up with a look up table of rules that created maps you could navigate through. A few tweaks to the table breaks the whole thing and there seems no logic or rules that are obvious as to why it works.

    It remains me of an old hardware experiment. I believe it was back in the 90s, someone created an early artificial system to try and find new ways to make CPUs. The idea was you have a programmable chip with pins in and pins out. The idea was to change the internals to works out the most optimal way to trigger some output when some condition was meet. One of the things the experiment threw up was a solution that worked but only worked when there has some logic circuits apparently unconnected to the bulk of the circuit. It appeared to do nothing but if you took it away the system failed. Read more about that here: https://www.damninteresting.com/on-the-origin-of-circuits/

    Back on topic, as they say in the article the clock is ticking on early computer game and technology history. The people involved are getting older and the environment is starting to degrade some on the older t technology. I'm sure there will be some gems lost but hopefully many more to be discovered.
     
    Last edited: 25 Sep 2019