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The Chinese are coming...

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Space and Planetary Science' started by amusicsite, 31 Oct 2011.

  1. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  2. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Meanwhile in America...

    http://news.cnet.com/8301-19514_3-2...old-shuttle-hangar-for-commercial-spacecraft/
     
  3. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    From the resources stance, it's reminiscent of the 60's when space really was a 'race'. The USA had its massive decade of spending in the wake of Kennedy's famous challenge, but between domestic and foreign policy demands (including Vietnam) the attitude to space expenditure changed - I think forever - once the goal had been reached. The Chinese aren't limited by that, so they can potentially achieve great things in space. And there's no doubt that having space ambitions and making them happen is still seen as one of the measures of a nation's standing in the world, just as it was back then.

    The manned exploration of the Moon and beyond will be the thing that really catches the attention of the masses round the world again. There's an entire generation who didn't experience the excitement of it first time round and another who did but wouldn't mind seeing it happen again with 21st century communications quality. I hope the Chinese - and I think they'll be the ones to do it - are happy to share the coverage; as a naive idealist, I'll always believe that the exploration of space ultimately has to be about the achievements and knowledge of humankind, not any single nation. It should unite us, not divide us.
     
  4. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    I'm willing to bet there will be a Chinese restaurant on the moon before a McDonalds :p:
     
    Shaun likes this.
  5. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  6. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    Landing in the Bay of Rainbows - a good choice IMO, relatively flat and pretty featureless. A really long way from any of the Apollo landing sites - I think 15 was closest, near the Hadley Rille. What a great mission that was - from the fun of the hammer and feather experiment to the Lunar Rover and the discovery of the 'Genesis Rock'.

    Really looking forward to the Chinese progressing to human exploration. It's going to be amazing.
     
    Shaun and amusicsite like this.
  7. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  8. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Looks like next up is mainly do the same again. Then that is the end of these missions and move on to building a proper space station and maybe off to the moon.

    They are catching up fast.
     
  9. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    It will be interesting to see whether a new era of lunar exploration captures the imaginations of people born since the Apollo missions. I think it will. As I said, there are generations of people who have never shared the excitement of lunar missions. People for whom space exploration is largely a machine-focused activity. Humans relate in the main to humans; they find it hard to relate as easily to, or get involved with, the achievements of machines, even if they were designed and have their data interpreted by humans.

    The Moon still holds a fascination. I for one was sad when the Apollo missions ended and it's been far too long since then. The Shuttle was useful, the deep space and planetary probes have been interesting, but a significant aspect of space exploration is really about the human experience; going there, seeing it with human eyes and allowing billions back on Earth to share the achievement and the sense of wonder.
     
  10. mrBishboshed

    mrBishboshed Member Geek

    Location:
    Essex UK
    Space should be a frontier we brave without the outdated notion of nation states. For the really exciting challenges we will all need to work together. Now what are the chances of that?
     
    beanz likes this.
  11. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    In a sense, it is the only way forward. If there is to be space exploration in 50 or 100 years' time, economics may determine that it cannot be a factional thing. It is just possible that cooperation in space will become the norm as the financial stringencies of the future bite into the industrialised nations of the present.
     
  12. nigel-yz1

    nigel-yz1 Well-Known Geek

    Good luck to the Chinese. They should recruit the little git that's been trying to connect to my remote desktop for the past 3 hours from IP: 116.118.119.140. They could do with using is amazing talents less time wasting purposes than trying to hack a small double-glazing company :mad:
     
  13. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Of course you can fake your IP address or hide behind some dodgy Chineese one, there is just as much chance your attacker is sitting in Auckland, Bristol or Cannes as there is them coming from China.

    p.s. you need absolutely no tallent to try bad hacking, which is half the problem...
     
  14. Zye-Rouges

    Zye-Rouges Member Geek

    Location:
    CT
    It is ironic that the Chinese have taken the optimism about space from our science fiction media to heart, whereas in America, our leaders seem to think of space as though it exists ONLY in science fiction.
     
  15. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    I think the difference is China can afford it America can't.
     
  16. Zye-Rouges

    Zye-Rouges Member Geek

    Location:
    CT
    America and the word Can't don't belong in the same sentence. But notice, Deep Space Industries, Paragon, SpaceX and Planetary Resources are all funded by private individuals -- billionaires (incidentally billionaires who have collaborated together in years past). That's because commercial funding is being denied by US banks, much the way people exacerbated the Great Depression by hiding their money in mattresses. The money is here, but the people who have it lack the imagination and courage to use it.
     
  17. Zye-Rouges

    Zye-Rouges Member Geek

    Location:
    CT
    And...the Chinese have an ENORMOUS structure built underground. They say it's buried ruins; I think it's Mos Eisley...
     
    amusicsite likes this.
  18. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  19. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  20. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK