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Tesla - Elon Musk's master plan

Discussion in 'The Coffee Shop' started by amusicsite, 21 Jul 2016.

  1. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    https://www.tesla.com/blog/master-plan-part-deux

    In short, Master Plan, Part Deux is:

    Create stunning solar roofs with seamlessly integrated battery storage
    Expand the electric vehicle product line to address all major segments
    Develop a self-driving capability that is 10X safer than manual via massive fleet learning
    Enable your car to make money for you when you aren't using it
     
  2. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    https://www.tesla.com/blog/gaining-momentum-tesla-powerpack

    More news expected tomorrow too.
     
  3. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    beanz and Yellow Fang like this.
  4. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-australia-power-tesla-idUSKBN19S0EV

    Well it looks like Tesla has won the 100MW battery contract in Australia. The one he promised to deliver in 100 days or they would get it for free. So the clock is ticking now, as it's from when they sign the contract.

    It's supposed to be enough power to supply 10% of the region's power for one hour, which don't sound like a lot but should be good enough to cache enough power to cope with a small drop in wind. As this is tied to a wind farm that's what it will mainly be caching, excess wind power.

    I guess if they can do it in 100 day then that will be the big thing. It's one thing to get a 100MW battery, it's quite another to be able to roll out this size projects in a few months. If we are truly going to install hundreds of thousands of these, which we will need to go renewable, then installing them quickly is going to be key.

    Price and lifespan is the other factor but I've not heard what the cost of this is or how often they expect to have to change bad cells.
     
  5. Yellow Fang

    Yellow Fang Veteran Geek

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    He's a smart guy. By comparison, Richard Branson looks unambitious, James Dyson, a lightweight.
     
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  6. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Richard Branson is just a money man, he has created more failed companies than most and sells stuff off once it returns a profit. Most of the Virgin branded stuff is owned by someone else now and I can't think of anything he has actually invented or even developed.

    James Dyson came up with the wonderful idea of the bagless vacuum cleaner and, although he had to fight to stop someone stealing his idea, once he got his product to market and made a name for himself has done nothing to improve the product. I was with someone the other day that was delighted that they offered them a new vacuum for £200 as a better option than £100 to repair the old one. They are poorly made cheap crap made for as little as possible, hard to repair (by design) and I would never buy one. It seems he is more keen on patents these days and making money off that...

    Whereas Elon has often said making money is not his goal, obviously it might be a nice sideline and needs to do it at some point. Though he would much rather advance renewable energy and space flight then go out of business than to make a company that got to a point where it was profitable and rested on his laurels. Tesla is the perfect name for his products as there is a bit of the Nikola Tesla spirit in him that makes the other 'Thomas Edison' type people look like business men more than inventors.
     
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  7. classic33

    classic33 Über Geek

    Lets not forget Dysons "Ballbarrow"!
     
  8. Yellow Fang

    Yellow Fang Veteran Geek

    Location:
    Reading
    I was unaware that Elon Musk had tried to sue Top Gear over some unfair criticism. I saw him explain it on a YouTube clip. He said one of his staff had seen a script on the table even before they'd tested the car. The car battery did not actually run flat. It got down to 20% charge, so they did not have to push it off the track. It only did 55 miles, not 200 miles, but I suppose that 200 mile figure means up to 200 miles if you drive very carefully, not thrash it around a track. A bit like manufacturers' mpg figures depending on driving at a constant 56 mph. Clarkson said that they went to get the other Tesla but it was still recharging and the brakes had failed. Musk said the brakes had not failed, but a fuse had blown. Tesla actually failed in their court case. I can sort of see both sides.


    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QErBQWUQyEI
     
    Last edited: 17 Jul 2017
  9. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Top Gear stopped being a car show a long time ago. Even by their own definition it's an entertainment show these days, maybe less so since the Grand Tour spun off.

    It was well documented at the time that the piece on Tesla's car was pure entertainment and not much fact.
     
  10. classic33

    classic33 Über Geek

    Given that a braking effect(I was told about 60% of the total) is being generated by the electric motors, as well as by actual brakes(smaller because of this). A fuse blowing would mean greater strain on a smaller system.

    Witness the high speed failures in F1, of similar systems.
     
  11. Yellow Fang

    Yellow Fang Veteran Geek

    Location:
    Reading
    He is a charming chap. He agrees with Stephen Hawking about space exploration and colonisation.


    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-uLAFb7GOg


    I wish I shared his confidence about solar power in the UK. The last project I was involved in was a photovoltaic-thermal array that supplied source heat for a heat pump, which provided domestic hot water and central heating. Sadly the project was cancelled. The running costs were low, but it was just too expensive to install. Personally, I thought there was a business in it, but it would have required deep pockets.
     
  12. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    We have a great community company where I live. They sell 'shares' which when it reaches a certain level they use the money to install solar panels on a commercial building, at no expense to the company. They then sell the electricity to the company cheaper than they would have paid via the grid. Once the money from that has paid back the set up costs, return on investment for the shareholders and a small operating profit, they then pay back the investors with profit. The solar panels then are give free to the company whos roof they are on and they get free electricity from then on.

    It's been extremely successful and a mass of warehouses, churches and the like have taken advantage of it. Seems like a win, win system for everyone.
     
  13. Yellow Fang

    Yellow Fang Veteran Geek

    Location:
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    So Elon Musk blasted a Tesla sports car into space. I heard it will do a pass-by Mars and then orbit the sun forever. For some reason I don't like the idea of that.
     
  14. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Not quite sure why you don't like the idea bit it was a test flight and all test flights carry a dummy load. It's just in this case it was an expensive car rather than a lump of concrete, which is often used. The idea was to show it could launch something deep in space so it would not have been piratical to have something come back and burn up in the atmosphere. Which means whatever they launched would be floating around in space anyway.

    As it's a high value object, even more so now, there is always the option to capture it as some point and return it to Earth / Mars. As it will be in an elliptical orbit around the sun, with the min around Earths orbit and the max way beyond Mars' orbit there will be times it comes close to both and quite a few people think there will be an attempt to re-capture it some point. Which would be another amazing first. That is of course if it doesn't get hit by a space rock and get smashed into a million little pieces.
     
  15. Yellow Fang

    Yellow Fang Veteran Geek

    Location:
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    I suppose I don't like it for several reasons. One is that I had recently read an IET article about the amount of junk there was in orbit. However, the Tesla will end up well away from Earth orbit where there little chance of it getting in the way. Another reason I don't like it is that it's a bit of a joke and an ego trip. If the boss thinks of it, it gets done. If anyone else thought of it, it wouldn't get done. I don't suppose there are any technical reasons why they should not use a Tesla sports car rather than any other load.
     
  16. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    A lot of people are saying that most of the car, except the metal frame, will get blasted to bits by cosmic radiation and as you say it's not in near Earth orbit so it's not really problematic space junk. As far as the stunt goes, I see it quite differently. To me it has made the launch much more popular than using a typical dummy load and hopefully inspired more people to take up science and especially rocket science. Like the Apollo or Space Shuttle missions before them you will get innovators in 10 years time say this stunt got them into science. Even if it is a bit crass.
     
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  17. classic33

    classic33 Über Geek

    Try sorting that out on the insurance!

    Think of the mileage on a single charge.
     
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  18. Yellow Fang

    Yellow Fang Veteran Geek

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    One thing I wonder about Musk's enterprises is do they actually return a profit? He has so many projects on the go and they all need monster investment. You hear of IT companies like Twitter, who are massive, yet are not actually profitable.
     
  19. classic33

    classic33 Über Geek

  20. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Well Elon recently said they have a $12 billion backlog of orders so I think that side of his empire seems quite healthy.

    As far as the cars go, it's a matter of scale. His target is to get 2,500 Model 3 vehicles per week by the end of March and 5,000 units per week by the end of the second quarter.To make money they have to ramp up production, which means getting a supply chain sorted to provide the stuff they need to make them.The same is true of his battery and solar business. This take time and a lot of money to get set up but once they start meeting these targets and start to recoup the costs of setting this up,then they will start making a profit.

    It's a lot better prospect than someone like Twitter who have only just made a profit and who's growth is fairly flat.
     
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