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SpaceX

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Space and Planetary Science' started by Shaun, 27 May 2014.

  1. Shaun

    Shaun Über Geek

    SpaceX's Dragon spacecraft leaves the International Space Station after a month-long mission aboard the orbital outpost. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

    Video provided by Reuters: http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/12470d0f753333b982fb71ae72f4ebee.htm

    Dragon is the only space station resupply spacecraft able to return to Earth intact. It will return about 2,668 pounds (1,210 kilograms) of science samples from human research, biology and biotechnology studies, physical science investigations and education activities.

    Experiment samples coming back to Earth will help researchers continue to assess the impact of long-duration spaceflight on the human body. Returning plant samples will aid in food production during future long-duration space missions and enhance crop production on Earth. Crystals grown aboard and returning from the station could help in the development of more efficient solar cells and semiconductor-based electronics.


    More details and photos of the CRS-3 space station resupply mission here: http://www.spacex.com/news/2014/05/18/crs-3-mission-overview

    More details on Dragon here: http://www.spacex.com/dragon
    Dragon is a free-flying spacecraft designed to deliver both cargo and people to orbiting destinations. Dragon made history in 2012 when it became the first commercial spacecraft in history to deliver cargo to the International Space Station and safely return cargo to Earth, a feat previously achieved only by governments. It is the only spacecraft currently flying that is capable of returning significant amounts of cargo to Earth. Currently Dragon carries cargo to space, but it was designed from the beginning to carry humans. Under an agreement with NASA, SpaceX is now developing the refinements that will enable Dragon to fly crew. Dragon's first manned test flight is expected to take place in 2-3 years.

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    amusicsite likes this.
  2. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Welcome to the new space race. To boldly profit where none have profited before.

    Two big breakthroughs this week.

    SpaceX Wins NASA’s looks like it's got the contract to carry Commercial Crew Mission to ISS

    http://northerncalifornian.com/cont...’s-contract-carry-commercial-crew-mission-iss


    Blue Origin’s New Shepard space vehicle also successfully flew to space, reaching its planned test altitude of 329,839 feet (100.5 kilometers) before executing a historic landing back at the launch site.


    View: http://youtu.be/9pillaOxGCo
     
  3. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  4. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  5. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  6. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    I watched live in the end on the TV via the Virgin box, which I'm happy to say they have updated and is a bit smoother now as well as finally supporting live streams. All went smoothly and it's amazing the shots they can get these days.

    Was amazed how much the boat rocks around and they still manage to land something so big with a high centre of gravity on it. Well done for cracking that though, once they have fully licked that trick you have to say landing anywhere else will be a piece of cake.

    I'm not sure if they plan to reuse this one or not. That's the real test.
     
  7. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  8. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Flight successful, stage 1 safely back on the pad, payload in orbit and an approximate $25 million saving in launch cost.
     
  9. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  10. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  11. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  12. classic33

    classic33 Über Geek

    Eyes now set on the red planet.
     
  13. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Falcon Heavy launch day today.... Providing the weather improves.

    This is what is supposed to happen, beautifully done in sync with the songs lyrics.

    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tk338VXcb24


    All going well you can see if they get it right live here.

    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbSwFU6tY1c


    Though there have been a few delays and tomorrow is reserved for a 2nd attempt.

    I find it quite amazing that they intend to save all three boosters, that would be quite an achievement and the two coming down together should look amazing.
     
  14. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  15. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Success!!!

    DVYUXb9U8AAaEtW.jpg:large.jpeg DVYWR2IUQAAutMB.jpg DVYYFPhXUAIhkqX.jpg:large.jpeg
     
  16. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/13/spacex-falcon-heavy-rocket-one-year-later-business-case.html

    This is quite a nice review of the first year of the falcon heavy. Looks like they have probably made their development money back with the orders so far. Not likely to be used much at the moment but their is demand for it's use. They may even be able to drop the price a bit to ramp up demand if they wanted.

    If it becomes a cheap reliable reusable rocket. It could position itself as a cheap enough option for the companies that want to build large stuff in space to use and realise their dreams. Most of these companies seem to have plans to fly multiple loads up and construct things in space. It's really about a good price per kg and sending as much up as possible each time. I think the heavy might just hit the right price point and capacity to kick start mass continuation in orbit.
     
  17. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Well it's splashdown time for the SpaceX dragon crew capsle and looks like it's been a successful mission all round.

    Launch OK.
    Automated docking OK.
    Separation OK.
    Touchdown OK.

    Next up they will be checking Ripley, the sensor filled dummy on board to check the gravitational forces and things like that. If all looks good then it's the next big step of putting up the first real humans.
     
  18. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    https://phys.org/news/2019-05-spacex-satellites-rocket-advance-big.html

    SpaceX are getting ready to ramp up their ambition of setting up a truly global internet network from space. With a revolutionary 60 mini satellites in one launch, except they have delayed the launch till next week as they have found a software update they want to do before launch.

    The payload has a craft that will deploy the satellites once in orbit, deploying one at a time into a chase orbit so they go around in a chain like pattern. These are still test versions and can only communicate with ground stations. The final plan is that they will also be able to communicate with each other. Presumably this will allow them to send data to nearer where it is needed from space before sending the signal back to earth.

    As far as I understand this is not really for communication direct from your device but more a case of using something like a satellite dish to access the network. Which would mainly benefit remote villages, ships out in remote places, aeroplanes and the like.

    These test ones will be at a higher orbit than the ones they want to mainly use after the two test prototypes they launched recently had an unacceptable lag. The lower they can fly them the less the lag. Also once they go end of life it's easier to send them back to earth and they are designed to fully burn up on reentry.