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Old or new record deck - which would you go for?

Discussion in 'Audio Visual and Digital Home' started by beanz, 29 Apr 2013.

  1. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    We have a collection of lp records and singles dating back a fair while and for a number of years we haven't had a record deck to play them on.

    Assuming we do want to hear them played again (not all available on cd for one thing!) would you go for buying a usb 'archiving' type of turntable or plump for a traditional - possibly second-hand - turntable that would plug into our existing music setup?
     
  2. rusky

    rusky Staff Member

    I personally would go for a traditional turntable but I suppose it depends on if you enjoy the warmth of vinyl or just want to archive it to digital.
     
  3. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    also depends if you have a good sound card. it's not exactly hard to wire up the audio out of an old record deck to the audio in.

    I can't imagine that the needles on the USB ones are much cop...
     
  4. Shaun

    Shaun Über Geek

  5. Alex H

    Alex H Senior Geek

    Location:
    Central France
  6. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

  7. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    I had a feeling people might say I'd need two. I like the look of the simplicity of the archiving turntables but the nostalgic in me likes the appeal of the more traditional kit. Having two does raise issues of clutter and we're definitely in de-cluttering mode this year.

    My computer has a fairly decent sound card so maybe a deck with the right outputs is the way to go.

    I hadn't fully realised how, despite the resurgence in interest in vinyl, there are relatively few places to go to buy what used to be called 'hi-fi separates' and almost none on the high street. Prices seem to have taken a hike too. Make anything 'cool' and it seems you can add a zero to the cost!
     
  8. Alex H

    Alex H Senior Geek

    Location:
    Central France
    Got one of these near you? http://www.richersounds.com/
     
  9. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    Been looking on their website today. We actually do have a specialist hifi shop not too far a ride away, tucked away in a relative backstreet but there nonetheless. I've been looking on their website as well as various audio forums too and there seems to be quite a volume of opinion (pun intended) that some of the older kit is pretty hard to beat - if you can find it, that is.

    Quite looking forward to finding out more. I think it's going to be a choice between an older, more trad turntable and a newer one with USB. Thinking I might get more for my money buying secondhand and doing a few improvements to the deck I get.
     
    amusicsite likes this.
  10. nigel-yz1

    nigel-yz1 Well-Known Geek

    I'd be looking at one of the Pro-ject or Rega turntables to add to my separates system. It was on the plan until I decided to sell the house.
     
    beanz and Shaun like this.
  11. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  12. nigel-yz1

    nigel-yz1 Well-Known Geek

  13. Shaun

    Shaun Über Geek

    Oooohhh you can't have that - lasers are no good - they're not "true" vinyl players ... they're like, all digital 'n' sh*t ... init <sniggers> :laugh:
     
  14. sidevalve

    sidevalve Well-Known Geek

    It's those cylinder jobs you'll have the REAL problem with.
     
  15. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    My research came up with the Pro-ject Debut 3 SE and the Rega RP1 as the strongest contenders for me in the 'new kit' options. The Rega RP1 especially looks pretty neat and gets good reviews. Over £200 without the 'performance pack' - nearer £300 with - but for something I'd expect to keep for a very long time, I suppose that isn't bad.
     
    Shaun likes this.
  16. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    This weekend I rediscovered a record shop where last time I went in to buy an album 32 was years ago. Still there, not very different at all either - same racks and boxes of vinyl, the only difference being that most of it is now second-hand where back then most of it was new.

    It got me thinking of the reasons I'm getting back into vinyl.

    When I was an album buyer, it meant:
    • reading reviews of an album or waiting on a release date
    • getting into town on the bus a Friday afternoon or Saturday morning - no Sunday opening then
    • visiting the shop (shops - there were maybe half a dozen places you could buy music back then)
    • buying the album - if you were lucky, getting to listen to a track from it on the shop's superior music system
    • trawling the other album boxes while there to see if any good second-hand stuff had come in during the week, taking likely 'finds' out of sleeves and inspecting the vinyl in the light before purchase
    • chatting with the guy who owned the shop about music news and gigs you'd been to
    • getting the bus home, protecting the album(s) in the shop's plastic bag from other people bumping into it / the rain / the sun / curious dogs
    • making a coffee, thinking about when best to listen to the album(s)
    • telling mates what you'd just bought and hearing about what they had picked up
    • at the appointed time, opening the record shop's bag, removing the disc and gazing upon the pristine / fretting over the second-hand grooves
    • powering up the stereo, dusting the turntable, checking the stylus
    • making another coffee and choosing a biscuit or three, settling down on the settee to marvel on the album cover artwork and read the lyrics off the inner or sleeve while enjoying 20+ mins per side of superb music
    Nowadays, if you want a piece of music, you can head off to iTunes or Amazon or wherever, pay online, have it delivered almost instantly and be listening to it a minute later. This is way more convenient. You don't have to buy a full album either; there must be many people whose entire music collection consists of individual songs and very few complete albums. You can carry your whole music collection around on a portable player. And there's the cd. Smaller, arguably more robust (not everyone would agree; I've ruined a few cds in my time), fits through the letterbox, widely sold - far more widely than vinyl ever was.
    Quality of sound considerations aside - people never agree - there will be those who think of vinyl as involving a lot of faff, and maybe it does. But what's driven me back to it is the different experience. Anyway, I bought an album, my first in decades, one I'd had on cassette back in the days, after a nice chat with the record shop guy about the particular production issues it had way back. Mrs Beanz said, as I left the shop with my 'prize', I was beaming like a kid who'd just spent his pocket money on a Saturday morning. Which I had! :cool: The album's still sitting in the record shop's bag waiting for my new turntable to arrive. The preamp is bought and ready...
     
    Gene Gibly likes this.
  17. Gene Gibly

    Gene Gibly Active Geek

    Pocket money - love it - we had to save quite a lot of weeks pocket money to buy an album, but I bet it's a great experience all the same; sliding the disc out of the sleeve (holding the edges in the palm of your hand so as not to 'grease-up' the playing surface), lovingly and gently laying it down on the platter, getting it up to speed and then lightly landing the needle on the run-in groove.

    oohhhh yeah!! :D
     
  18. Gene Gibly

    Gene Gibly Active Geek

    Oh, and not forgetting the 'crackle' of the intro as you sit in anticipation of it starting. :D
     
  19. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Reading the cover over and over again on the bus going home from the shop... Ahhh memories..... Though much prefer the fact I can now just listen to music on the bus all day long without thinking about it.

    96k (48KHz) audio is the best. 99% of people can't tell it's better than 44.1k and no one has ever been able to hear any difference in anything higher. It really does seem to be the top. It's just a shame that CD's 44.1k audio format seems to be the gold standard. Even that seems to have been replaced by even lower quality MP3's.

    It's a shame that the likes of Apple and Amazon don't sell higher quality downloads than mp3's. I could be quite tempted to get a nice big hard drive dedicated to high quality audio linked up to my sexy speakers. Might be what my Pi ends up being. I mainly have stuff on MP3 at the moment, then again that's for listening to out and about with background noise drifting through, so quality ain't too much of a problem. But I do miss having the pile of records/cd's next to the dedicated hi-fi. Just having them there seems to remind you that they are there and get used more...
     
    Gene Gibly and Shaun like this.
  20. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    It's not that I'm totally averse to mp3 and cd as formats. For on the move music, when you think about the cassette players we all thought were pretty neat, things have come on so amazingly and to have the option of a tiny, portable music system is great. But I think I made a mistake leaving my vinyl behind entirely for the new formats. Listening to music shouldn't be always a fast-food experience. I'm not evangelising about it - but am genuinely quite excited to be building a system again after 10 years away from the medium.
     
    Shaun and amusicsite like this.