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NASA

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Space and Planetary Science' started by rusky, 14 Sep 2011.

  1. rusky

    rusky Staff Member

    beanz likes this.
  2. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    Good to have a vehicle in production - and hopefully, it will have a long service life. 6 years until the first developmental flight though.
     
  3. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Who would have thought a big tube of fuel and a few rockets would take so long to develop :p:

    What do you think the chances of them actually getting it done by then anyway and will China/India/Russia get something better done first?



    Are SUV's now a standard unit of weight measurement. I preferred it when it was elephants. p.s. what's the conversion ratio of SUV weight to elephant weight?
     
  4. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    I think they'll get it done to the timescale - it sounds like they're using a lot of existing expertise and experience which should mean a smoother developmental path. Also, controlling costs seems to be getting mentioned a lot - and overruns are generally costly.

    What's really exciting about the emergence of the other nations as major players in space is that they may decide to set completely different targets. I hope it turns out to be less of a competition between nations - we've been there before - and more a chance for space technology and exploration to advance on several fronts simultaneously.
     
  5. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  6. Marin

    Marin Well-Known Geek

    It is really generating publicity, but NASA needs all it can get at the moment. Kepler has been doing great and is incredibly valuable. It'll take a lot more time to sift through these and find potential similar exoplanets, but we've done a lot of the important ground work now.

    It's a similar thing with the latest rover Mars mission. The media got pretty bored with the various other rovers that have gone to Mars so they've had to play up the risks of the latest mission and how large the vehicle is. I just hope it lands intact (not a given at all).
     
  7. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK


    Up and down again with the booster rockets.
     
    Shaun likes this.
  8. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    The solid rocket boosters themselves always struck me as one of the 'back-to-the-future' aspects of the Shuttle programme, but they were certainly impressive.

    While we're paying homage to the Shuttle, did you see the article about the guy who sent a Lego Space Shuttle up on a balloon recently?
     
  9. Shaun

    Shaun Über Geek

  10. Shaun

    Shaun Über Geek

    Cracking video - especially watching the speed top 2900+MPH then slow to just 56 MPH for splashdown! :D
     
  11. Shaun

    Shaun Über Geek

    Now that the Shuttle program has ended, what is NASA doing?

    I've always seen them as primarily a human/space vehicle organisation, with the Apollo rockets and Shuttles, but are they still launching rockets/vehicles and still as active in space exploration as they once were?
     
  12. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Last I heard they want to get out of the launch vehicle business and concentrate on the deep space science stuff.

    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/SOFIA/index.html

    Bit like this. They use an off the shelf but highly modified Boeing 747SP aircraft that carries a telescope. They could have designed their own craft but a commercial one works fine.

    I think the are hoping the commercial space industry can develop the vehicles they need then they can concentrate on the probes and things to send out over the solar system.
     
    Shaun likes this.
  13. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  14. LinuxorBust

    LinuxorBust Member Geek

    Location:
    California
    Herd the are hitching rides with Russia. Wow Dictatorship from Space...They are sending you are bill because all they produce is debt.,
     
  15. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    http://redicecreations.com/article.php?id=20051

    While I can sympathize with the desire to protect the moon landing sites. I thought the idea was no one owed the moon. Not that I think that is sustainable. One day people will live on the moon and they will want to own the land.

    Anyway, you can ask. But typically laws and rules get ignored if you have no one to enforce them.
     
  16. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    I'd say there's a certain historic value to the first landing sites, much in the way the landing points of explorers throughout history have been singled out as special. From that point of view I don't think it's up to NASA to 'stake a claim' - the sites ought to be recognised and protected by international consent much in the way that world heritage sites are.

    The problem with space belonging to no-one is one of interpretation - does it therefore belong to everyone, and if so, who is in a position to tell anyone else that what they plan to do is wrong?

    Space lawyers... it's only a matter of time :rolleyes:
     
  17. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    People are already cyber-squatting on the domain names :p: Intergalactic Law PHD anyone?

    I guess the problem is.. If China land somewhere else, can the claim that as a special site (i.e. claiming they are it's protector/owner) as it's their first landing site, could India do the same, Russia too. Is it land ownership by the back door?
     
  18. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    "We came in peace for all mankind." says the plaque Apollo 11 left behind on the Moon. I may be naive, but sometimes in naivety there is an expressway to the ideal. A free-for-all in space exploration risks conflict and waste. There's enough of that going on on Earth. There will always be national interests at stake in some aspects of space - communication satellites for instance - but on the bigger issues, I'd like to see nations working together in their future explorations so that the human and material resources are used wisely, costs shared and so that discoveries made benefit everyone and reflect the best that humanity can be.

    I think it's especially important that the legal status of astronomical exploration is updated and enforced given that more and more commercial enterprises seem to be showing an interest in space.
     
  19. Shaun

    Shaun Über Geek

    I think it's reasonable to protect the sites, but only within fairly minor limits - it wouldn't be reasonable of NASA to stake a claim to half of the moon on the basis it'll risk destroying their landing sites. A few miles circumference would do it wouldn't it?

    I like how the article hints that NASA might be wanting to cover-up evidence of maybe how the moon landings were fake and that how only limited evidence has ever been presented of the landing sites on the moon.

    Do we not have powerful enough telescopes to find the landing sites independently?
     
  20. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK