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Do you have a 4K Ultra HD TV on your shopping list?

Discussion in 'Audio Visual and Digital Home' started by Shaun, 26 Aug 2015.

  1. Shaun

    Shaun Über Geek

    My wife has firmly advised me that I won't be getting my hands on a 4K TV anytime soon, there's far too much other stuff that takes priority over an ultra-sharp high quality television image that blows standard definition TV out of the water.

    So are any of you looking at a TV upgrade in the near future and are you considering UHD 4K TVs or sticking with HD for now?
     
  2. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    We only bought a new HD tv just before Christmas and as it has a 5 year guarantee, I think we will be staying with it. I thought about 4K but for the cost I couldn't see enough difference when I looked at them in the shops.
     
  3. welsh dragon

    welsh dragon Active Geek

    Mr WD threatens/begs sometimes for a new TV, but we are going to stick with the HD Tv we have. My view is, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. My daughter has a 50 inch 3D TV and she kepps feeling ill when she looks at some films. As for 4K, I don't personally think its worth the money.
     
  4. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    One day I will certainly own a 4K TV, they have really dropped in price now... Then again it only cost them a couple of quid more to make than a HD TV. For now the HD TV is fine, not enough 4K content to really make it worth it at the moment.
     
  5. I thought about it when finally replacing my 14 year old 28" SDTV a few months ago but I decided that HD was good enough for now, especially with restricted access to higher resolution source material..

    My new 40" Samsung HDTV is great compared to my old CRT set. The one thing that I would have liked is better backlighting because I can see the 'dirty screen' effect when a large area of one colour is panned. It doesn't spoil my enjoyment, but I am aware of it.

    One day, when OLED sets are affordable and reliable, I will probably go for one of them and I imagine that would be 4K.

    A few hundred pounds in a few years time would be fine. A few thousand pounds now - NOT!
     
  6. andyfraser

    andyfraser Active Geek

    Location:
    Swindon, Wilts
    I rarely watch anything in HD anyway and still buy DVDs so 4k would be overkill. The only thing I watch that's mostly HD is Netflix. I only buy BDs if it's a film I really love or the BD is cheaper than the DVD (Asda did this for a while).
     
  7. I think the step-up in quality from SD to HD was huge, but I can't see the change to 4K being anywhere near as significant except for people who like sitting very close to TVs, or owning huge screens!

    Having said that, I haven't really seen a good 4K TV in action with good source material. The demos I have seen in stores have looked very over-processed and artificial. (Mind you, my HDTV didn't look brilliant until I changed it from its default settings to more sensible ones.)
     
  8. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    [​IMG]
     
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  9. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    I've seen charts like that one - it was part of the reason I decided against 4K. Our living room has us about 7-10ft away from a 48" HDTV and the picture is excellent. It will do for me. I'd rather any additional spending went on other tech at present.

    I wouldn't be surprised though if eventually, 4K took a better hold than 3D did as an innovation.
     
    Last edited: 27 Aug 2015
  10. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  11. My 40 inch screen probably sounds smallish by modern standards but it replaced a 28 inch CRT screen which was actually more like 26 inches of actual viewable screen so that is a huge increase in viewing area. It is amazing how quickly one gets used to the extra space though. I sit about 7 or 8 feet from it and that seems about right to me. Big enough, but not overpowering. (And it leaves room for bikes next to it! :okay:)

    The old TV had a massive bezel and was very deep so the front of the new set is not actually much bigger than the old one, and only about a tenth of the depth.

    I don't really want a TV which dominates my room but if I did want a huge set, then it would have to be 4K or I would be back to seeing the pixels again. (Ok, the old set was analogue so it was more 'lines' than pixels, but you know what I mean!)
     
  12. classic33

    classic33 Über Geek

    Sky are dropping their 3D broadcasts, so the headaches will go.
     
    welsh dragon and amusicsite like this.
  13. welsh dragon

    welsh dragon Active Geek


    There aren't many 3D channels on sky anyway. Thank god.
     
    classic33 likes this.
  14. classic33

    classic33 Über Geek

    Last ones to go though. Can't have been that good.
     
    welsh dragon likes this.
  15. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    I always said this generation of 3D would be a fad like the one in the 80's. Yer, it was a bit better than the red/green glasses of old but with the same problems. You have to wear glasses and it's a bit of a gimmick. VR or real holograms is what people want next not a better version of 'fake depth perception'. Even VR and holograms will never be the de-facto way to watch things. I firmly believe that a good quality flat screen will almost always be popular. Better blacks, colour range, audio will surely be fought over but we will never need more than 4K in the home, maybe 8K if you have that mansion that will take the 150 inch TV.

    Which I think puts TVs into the category of 'after the next purchase I'll only replace it when it breaks'. Quite a few average consumer products seems to be hitting this level at the moment. Camera (for those that don't use their phones), Hi-Fi, printers, monitors, headphones/speakers and quite a few of the electronics industries bread and butter products of old seem to be hitting that point where the average consumer don't really expect or need the current ranges to do more than they can already. While not the end of the road yet as they do love to build in that 'built in redundancies' so things fail after a couple of years... That won't last for long though. Someone will work out how to make the 4K TV that is slightly over-engineered to last 100+ years and give the big companies a kick up the backside. Then the electronics products could become like a good wooden table or chair and last for a good couple of generations. Which will be good for the planet/e-waste problem but not such good news for the likes of Samsung, Sony, Panasonic and other companies who mainly make electronic devices. Especially when phones and computers hit that level too and you could argue that a quad core phone or i7 system would be more than enough power for the average user.

    Yes you will still be able to buy them but have you ever heard of a company that makes tables turning over a profit in the billions?
     
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  16. welsh dragon

    welsh dragon Active Geek

    How awful that is going to be, only buying items when they stop working. A real novel idea. You mean we are going to go back to the times before companies made things that have a specific shelf life deliberately, so consumers would have to buy new one?

    Thank god. Maybe that idea will catch on for other things, then maybe companies will make products that are more robust, then they will last even longer. We may even see the return of the little shops that did electrical repairs. Well I can dream can't I ?
     
    classic33 likes this.
  17. andyfraser

    andyfraser Active Geek

    Location:
    Swindon, Wilts
    TVs are going back to the model that existed when I was growing up. You'd buy (or rent, that was common) a TV and keep it until it broke. Sometimes it was worthwhile actually getting it repaired. My dad told me of a time before that when you'd always get your TV repaired and only replace it when it couldn't be repaired. They were very expensive and full of valves so easier to fix back then.
     
  18. welsh dragon

    welsh dragon Active Geek


    There was a time when everything was repaired. TV's, kettles, irons, Hi-fi, radios, clocks, cookers, washing machines, vacuum cleaners the list goes on and on. I remember well the electrical repair shop where you could buy anythinf, to fix anything. There were pipes leads, plugs, washers, thousands of items.mit wasn't that long ago either. I remember my mother taking the heating element out of the kettle and replacing it.:laugh:
     
  19. andyfraser

    andyfraser Active Geek

    Location:
    Swindon, Wilts
    I remember my dad replacing a kettle element too. And the washing machine repair man coming round. I also remember when I'd buy something electrical but forget to buy a plug so have to take the plug from something else then forget I'd removed that plug and so it went on. There'd always be a couple of things without plugs on until someone remembered to buy some.
     
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  20. welsh dragon

    welsh dragon Active Geek


    Ive done that as well. :D