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ISS.- International Space Station

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Space and Planetary Science' started by amusicsite, 26 Aug 2011.

  1. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    http://www.sen.com/news/cosmonauts-make-room-for-new-docking-module.html

    163rd time they have popped outside the space station to maintain the craft.

    "The main objective of the EVA was to move the Strela-2 cargo boom to the Zarya module from the Pirs docking compartment. Moving the boom is part of a plan to make room for the new Russian multipurpose laboratory module, called Nauka, to dock to the Zvezda nadir port. Moving the boom will also aid in preparing for undocking and disposal of the Russian Pirs docking module."

    Looks like the ISS is still expanding with a new lab coming soon.

    "Other tasks performed during the EVA were the installation of shields designed to protect the space station from micrometeoroids. The shields were installed on the outside of the Zvezda service module."

    Shield upgrade :)
     
    Shaun likes this.
  2. Shaun

    Shaun Über Geek

    A 6.5 hour EVA - impressive!

    Is there anywhere we can see recent images of the ISS? I've tried looking but can't find any that I can specifically date as recent - anyone have any good gallery references for the International Space Station?
     
  3. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    Shaun likes this.
  4. Shaun

    Shaun Über Geek

    Nice one - especially the missions list. So just how big is it going to get? Is there an end point, a final mission/module?
     
  5. BoforsGun

    BoforsGun Über Geek

    Location:
    UK
    Next thing you know it will be -

    [​IMG]
     
  6. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  7. BoforsGun

    BoforsGun Über Geek

    Location:
    UK
  8. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

  9. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
    I would guess that 50 years ago it was not such a working model as it is now. I am not a big trek fan but guess that the first ship was designed to look right then over time they worked out what would be in there.
     
  10. Rickshaw Phil

    Rickshaw Phil What happens if I push this button?

    Location:
    Shropshire
  11. beanz

    beanz Staff Member Staff Member

    True. Won't be for a while yet I'd imagine. Still, if my surname was Cochrane, it might be awfully tempting to name my son Zefram just in case! :laugh:
     
    Shaun and Rickshaw Phil like this.
  12. amusicsite

    amusicsite dn ʎɐʍ sᴉɥ┴ Staff Member

    Location:
    UK
  13. TheDoctor

    TheDoctor Rocket Engineer

    IIRC it's down to a different flight profile. The rocket isn't faster, or even different...
     
  14. Gene Gibly

    Gene Gibly Active Geek

    That's an impressive saving - I can't get the link to work - have they moved the launch area or do they simply chose a different time to launch so that the station is more "overhead" than before?

    And how does the docking work? Does the rocket fly up and "chase" the station from behind, or does it go up ahead of the station and "meet" it head-on?
     
  15. BoforsGun

    BoforsGun Über Geek

    Location:
    UK
    Sounds like the same thing I think before going on a date! :confused:
     
    amusicsite likes this.
  16. TheDoctor

    TheDoctor Rocket Engineer

    There's a Wiki page on the mission, and a Nasa spaceflight page on the faster flight profile.
    Essentially, you have get up there into as close an orbit to the Station as possible, then immediately start closing in on the thing. It needs a lot more planning and precision than the two-day flight plan, which you can do most days. And yes, you chase it from behind. I once saw the Station with a Shuttle just behind it, ready to dock :cool:
     
  17. Shaun

    Shaun Über Geek

    Wow - that's some forward planning - and if anything unexpected happens, they drop back to the previous two day rendezvous profile.
     
  18. TheDoctor

    TheDoctor Rocket Engineer

    Yes, it's forward planning, but the delight of orbital mechanics is that everything is predictable.
    The two Voyager probes, f'rinstance, were launched in '77 and went to Jupiter, Saturn (including Titan), Uranus and Neptune (and Voyager 1 could have gone to Pluto, but Nasa opted for a good look at Titan instead). The orbital alignment that allowed this was recognised in the mid-60s.
    Similarly, a good orbital alignment allowed for a manned Mars mission in '86. It would have used Apollo-era hardware (!) and taken in a Venus flyby (!!) to get a slingshot flightpath out to Mars. This plan was the basis for a very good book by Stephen Baxter.
     
    BoforsGun likes this.
  19. Gene Gibly

    Gene Gibly Active Geek

    Why does it take so long to calculate? Do they start out with a big, wide, general plan and then fine-tune it over time to a much finer (and more accurate) flight path?

    And is it different for each launch or can they rinse 'n' repeat?
     
  20. Shaun

    Shaun Über Geek

    I liked the sound of that so checked it out in iTunes - £2.99 - downloaded. :bookworm:

    Thanks for the recommendation ... :thumbsup: